Head wrapping: The Sacred Art

Head wrapping: The Sacred Art

Head Wrapping or Head Decoration is an important part of everyday global dress. Head wraps are common cloth fabric adornments for covering ones hair. They beautify the wearer, identify with cultural ancestry and can also be worn to protect our hair and scalp against the the elements. In a typical African headwrap, a length of plain or patterned, cotton, cloth fabric is wound around the head to create a variety of different looking styles. Simple gauze scarves, wool, , muslin, silk, cotton  may also be used. In many countries, some styles are intended to provide padding to make it easier to carry heavy items on top of the head. Headwraps are commonly worn by women all over the world, even men in some regions wear head wraps. Ancient African queens wore a variety of head garments, not all of which were wraps. The royalty of Nigeria and the nearby West African region wore head wraps, but the queens of Nubia and Egypt wore headdresses. In countries such as Jamaica, Ethiopia, India and several others,  head wraps are worn for spiritual/religious reasons. Due to harse climates in countries like Niger, Mali and Morocco, head wrapping is part of everyday wear.  I see Head wrapping as an art form. We give the fabric life! So, when you decide to adorn with a head wrap, you have to bring your awesome sense of style to the mirror and you will see that  the results are fabulous. So with practice, practice and more practice… I promise you that with time, perseverance and your own unique sense of style and comfort, the sacred art and act of head wrapping evolves into part of your wardrobe and a more beautiful you!

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